Outlandishness

Faking Faith is out in under three weeks, and Publishers Weekly gave it a pretty great review!  And a good synopsis! Do you guys agree that it’s almost impossibly hard to write good synopses? SO HARD.  Personally, I’d rather write a whole book than synopsize anything. I’m in awe of people who do it well.

The review:

When 17-year-old Dylan Mahoney naively engages in “sexting,” she becomes an Internet phenomenon and a social pariah. Isolated from her friends and family, she retreats into the blogosphere, where she happens upon an online community of home-schooled teenage girls who write about their conservative Christian faith and document the blissful domesticity of their lives. Against her better judgment, she joins this community under false pretenses and develops a special friendship with a blogger named Abigail. The extraordinary set of events that ensue are at once outlandish and absolutely believable, thanks to Bloss’s compelling, down-to-earth prose. Conservative Christian characters who could easily be caricatured are multi-dimensional and complicated, and the lessons Dylan learns through her experiences with them are equally nuanced. Bloss somehow manages utter frankness and great generosity in her portrayal not only of Christian separatists, but also of typical modern families such as Dylan’s. Rather than promoting or demonizing any lifestyle, the novel illustrates how profoundly teenagers who seem to have nothing in common can connect and support each other, even as they choose very different paths.

Hooray!  I’m very pleased to be called both outlandish and believable.

(Okay, one thing missing that should be noted – the story also includes a CUTE BOY and maybe some semi-scandalous KISSING.  I couldn’t let that go unmentioned.  Because it’s IMPORTANT.)